Stephen’s Quintet

Stephen's Quintet

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2011 stats

Once again WordPress is wrong about the stats it has for my blog. It says I had about 120,000 hits. Try 138,000. It also says my post about average breast size was my most viewed post of the year. Coming in at number two is an old post about a Hubble contest. This is backwards. And not just by a little – the Hubble post got about 3,000 more hits than the other one. Finally, it says my busiest day was back in May, but this is false. My busiest day was just this month thanks to the Maloney post. I had 2,820 hits that day. (In fact, I had more hits the day after that post than I had on the day in May.)

Anyway. Here is WordPress’s amateurishly done stats summary for FTSOS.

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2011 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The Louvre Museum has 8.5 million visitors per year. This blog was viewed about 120,000 times in 2011. If it were an exhibit at the Louvre Museum, it would take about 5 days for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Hubble Snow Angel

I literally said “whoa” when I saw this:

Carina Nebula

Another great space photograph. From the site:

Several well known astronomical objects in and near the Carina Nebula can be seen in this wide field image: to the bottom left of the image is one of the most impressive binary stars in the Universe, Eta Carinae, with the famous Keyhole Nebula just adjacent to the star. The collection of very bright, young stars above and to the right of Eta Carinae is the open star cluster Trumpler 14. A second open star cluster, Collinder 228 is also seen in the image, just below Eta Carinae. North is up and East is to the left.

Galaxies of Hubble

Well, of the Universe. But as seen through the eye of Hubble.

I know I’ve posted this in the past, but it’s just such a great photograph.

Tarantula Nebula

Celestial Bauble

Hubble has another great capture. This one is being called a celestial bauble. And just in time for Christmas. What a crazy coincidence, I know. (SpaceDaily thought it prudent to dumb down the article title a bit.)

Celestial Bauble

This is called SNR 0509, which means it’s a supernova remnant. It’s located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, which looks a little something like this.

Large Magellanic Cloud

(None of this is here for or because of human existence, by the way.)